Philippine tarsier released back to the wild in Agusan Norte

By Alexander Lopez

March 2, 2022, 6:09 pm

<p><strong>BACK TO THE WILD.</strong> The Community Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO) in Nasipit, Agusan del Norte spearheads the release of a rescued Philippine tarsier on Monday (Feb. 28, 2022) in Barangay Bokbokon, Las Nieves town. The tarsier, found in good physical condition, was rescued last Feb. 22, 2022, by a resident in the area. <em>(Photo courtesy of CENRO-Nasipit)</em></p>

BACK TO THE WILD. The Community Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO) in Nasipit, Agusan del Norte spearheads the release of a rescued Philippine tarsier on Monday (Feb. 28, 2022) in Barangay Bokbokon, Las Nieves town. The tarsier, found in good physical condition, was rescued last Feb. 22, 2022, by a resident in the area. (Photo courtesy of CENRO-Nasipit)

BUTUAN CITY – The Community Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO) in Nasipit has released a Philippine tarsier (Carlito syrichta) found and rescued by a concerned citizen in the municipality of Las Nieves in Agusan del Norte province back to its natural habitat.

In a statement Wednesday, the CENRO-Nasipit said the released tarsier has a length of 36.5 centimeters.

“Mr. Edward M. Ruiz, a resident from Barangay Matabao, Buenavista, Agusan del Norte turned over the tarsier to this office. He rescued the wildlife last February 22, 2022 in Purok 22, Sitio New Cana-an, Barangay Lawan-lawan in Las Nieves town,” the CENRO-Nasipit said.

The agency said the tarsier was in good physical condition when released Monday in Barangay Bokbokon, Las Nieves.

Based on Administrative Order No. 2019-09 or the Updated National List of Threatened Philippine Fauna and Their Categories, the Philippine tarsier is classified as a threatened species.

There are 5,000 to 10,000 remaining tarsiers in the country but the group International Primate Protection League said the number is dwindling as the wildlife is facing multiple threats to its existence due to low birth rates, exploitative tourism, and habitat degradation from extractive activities such as logging and mining.

The Philippine tarsier is categorized as "near threatened" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species. (PNA)

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