(File photo)

MANILA – The Private Hospitals Association of the Philippines, Inc. (PHAPI) said Thursday the most severe and critical cases of the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) in their facilities are partially vaccinated or unvaccinated.

PHAPI president Dr. Rene de Grano said in a televised public briefing that the intensive care units of private hospitals in the country “can still cope with the (number) of Covid-19 patients.”

This was after Department of Health (DOH) officer in charge Maria Rosario Vergeire confirmed that the percentage of severe and critical Covid-19 cases in hospitals is increasing but is still within the threshold.

On Monday, the department reported 811 or 9.7 percent of the total Covid-19 admissions in hospitals are severe and critical cases.

In the past four weeks, DOH data showed that severe and critical infections comprised more than 9 percent of hospital admissions.

“’Yung mga na-admit na mas madami are the mild cases na incidental Covid. ‘Yung mga ganun, in a few days, nadi-discharge naman (Many among the admissions are mild cases that are incidental Covid. They are discharged in a few days),” de Grano said.

He noted that most of the Covid-19 cases that reach the critical or severe stage are the elderly with no vaccination.

As of August 22, about 72,310,149 or 92.59 percent of the country’s target population (78,100,578) have been vaccinated against Covid-19, including 78.01 percent of 8,721,357 senior citizens.

Meanwhile, 17,419,141 individuals have received booster shots out of the fully vaccinated population.

“Napansin lang namin na ‘yung mga na-admit na (We noticed that those admitted who are) immuno-compromised (and) with pre-existing diseases na hindi (who are not) fully vaccinated, ayun po ang nagpo-progress (those are the ones who progress) to severe and critical,” de Grano added.

The DOH, through the PinasLakas Campaign, continues to bring Covid-19 vaccines and booster doses closer to the people as health experts’ projections show that cases and hospitalizations would rise next month if the booster uptick remains low. (PNA)